The Bracelet – Excerpt from Chapter 13 of Turquoise Interlude –A Counterculture Memoir of Free Love, Drugs, and Personal Growth in New Mexico 1968-1970

… Santa Fe. 

The turquoise and silver Navajo and Zuni jewelry, like the sky reflecting the sun, glistened intensely in the late spring day in the Plaza of Santa Fe, 1969. The Indian jewelry and the woven blankets and baskets, like I had seen as a child, lay spread out on the red plaza stones, the turquoise and silver drawing me in, again and again. 

Memories of ancient lives filtered into the present. Memories from this life intertwined. I lingered and let my fingers touch many of the pieces. My thoughts receded and energy now directed my fingers. Oh how I loved the deep turquoise absorbing the brightness of the day.


The grey-braided woman watched intently, her rotund body leaning toward me over the brown Pendleton blanket where she was seated on the plaza ground. I took a silent, deep breath and felt myself still. Again, I lifted my hand above the jewelry and this time let it float slowly from piece to piece, until the movement stopped of its own volition. Guided by this unseen, kinesthetic force, my fingers finally rested on an old Zuni pawn piece placed among the newer jewelry. The small, teardrop stones were blue and green, calling me as their pattern radiated outward. I fell in love with the delicate, heavy bracelet, its multi-colored turquoise stones set in silver, lit by the afternoon sun. I handed the woman most of the wrinkled green bills extricated from my small leather purse, a smile inside me.

As I placed the bracelet on my wrist, it seemed to meld to me as if it were part of me. Cloud Girl again came alive. “Who am I?” I wondered, “Who am I to wear this sacred jewelry?” The three-tiered Zuni turquoise earrings had been my first purchase in the Taos Indian Pueblo. They had become a part of me; I wore them every day. And now the bracelet had joined my life.

©2021   Marianna Mejia

Now the Bracelet had Joined My Life – from Turquoise Interlude

The small, teardrop stones were blue and green, calling me as their pattern radiated outward. The grey-braided woman watched intently, her rotund body leaning toward me over the brown Pendleton blanket where she was seated. My fingers rested on an old Zuni pawn piece she had placed among the newer jewelry. I fell in love and paid for the large, stiff bracelet with wrinkled green bills extricated from my pocket where I had stuffed them. Cloud girl again came alive, as I wondered, “Who am I? Who am I to wear this sacred jewelry?” The three-tiered Zuni turquoise earrings had been my first purchase in the Taos Indian Pueblo. They had become a part of me; I wore them every day. Now the bracelet had joined my life.

©2016-2021 Marianna Mejia

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